RIVERINE ZONES
by PHILIPP GEIST

since 2006/ seit 2006 - ongoing project



Text Deutsch (siehe unten)

RIVERINE ZONES
Video-Water-Project by Philipp Geist

Water and time are the constants of Philipp Geist’s oeuvre. The artist, Berliner by choice works on an international level in a range of media, including video-installation, audio-visual performance, painting and photography. Much of his work deals with the integration of space, sound and the moving image.

The room-sized video-installation Riverine Zones takes the viewer on a discovery through international rivers. Geist’s work allows us to encounter a familiar world from which we are simultaneously removed. Using an underwater camera he explores the various parts of the river: its surface, the riverbed and the deep and shallow waters. With a view from the water he also includes the riverside or „riverine“, which lends its name to the project.

Rivers are part of our environment. We see them from cars, experience them on pleasure boats or sit on their banks. We have an idea of what they look like beneath the surface. Documentaries on fish and underwater plants supply us with the images. But who knows what really happens in their depths, when no one is collecting data, recording documentaries – when the camera’s viewfinder is not hunting rare species and geological formations. Riverine does not focus on photorealist imagery or on capturing nature in real time; it only follows a partly documentary approach. Whoever encounters the Riverine Zones’ video installation is captivated by an alternative place and time with its own laws and movements.

Nevertheless, Geist’s films do not show random details of life in a river or fortuitous recordings. Philipp Geist stands by the riverside or on a bridge and guides the camera. It goes down a long rope and floats in the waves of the river. Currents and eddies have a strong influence on the camera’s activity, so pan shots and movements that are regularly used on land are not possible in this situation. However, the artist views the camera’s take on a monitor that stands next to him and can therefore decide on how long and how to film.

Used in this way, the camera encounters many creatures, stones and debris, or simply looks into the void. We see floating particles, bubbles or just impenetrable grey. To a certain extent, these images have a documentary aesthetic and are rather alien, crude, pixelated, blurred, colour intensive, but also monochrome. The camera takes us into an underwater world we never knew, a world that is created by the camera itself. Besides the particular recording and operating methods, it is also the use of diverse underwater cameras, which with their rather simple design and occasional use of light emitters portray the underwater world in an alienated way. Geist’s cameras achieve an entirely novel colouration and overexposure of the created images.

We feel cut of from life above the water, plunged and submerged into an immediate parallel world. Even when Geist films the riverside with his camera submerged halfway, the otherwise known environment becomes estranged through this change of perspective and since the familiar sounds from the outside world are missing. The artist adds a monotonous underwater sound to his images. While viewing his work the viewer feels like a swimmer, resurfacing repeatedly, still disoriented due to unfamiliar sounds and a diagonally upwards perspective.

Through this perspective the well-known cityscapes are experienced anew. From the recordings of 19 rivers to date, which are part of this long-term project, some films show capital cities or major cities in Europe and North America. Streams, rivers and small creeks get treated equally within the installation project that is to be extended with rivers from other continents, notably Asia and Africa.

Philipp Geist contrasts underwater worlds from different cities and places: the clear water of a river contrasts with a canal full of discarded objects, including cans, street signs and even bikes. Like a searcher, Geist traces creatures and plant life with his underwater cameras. His films bring to the fore aspects of how humans handle the precious water resources in different regions of the world. The timeliness of environmental issues and the impact of environmental protection are not being told with a wagging finger, since this has already even caused some people to stop trying. Geist shows in an unfamiliar and subtle way how nice, puzzling and worth protecting the environment is, which we are poisoning.

Apart form the confusion created through unfamiliar combinations of movements and perspectives, the viewer’s orientation is being complicated further by the way how the video recordings and stills are presented. Geist’s exhibition concepts make it possible to plunge into the visual world of various streams and rivers simultaneously. Especially, the wall encompassing projections with several video projections create this scenario. The familiar bodily connection to a place is disturbed and the partly realistic impression of the image gives the viewer the sensation of being in two places at once.

The project is always perceived anew for each exhibition space. Therefore even in smaller spaces the films can be shown on monitors, which are placed on top of each other or next to one another. This way a new spatiality is created. The geometrical, fixed and technical format of the monitors gives the river, respectively the water with its typical traits of naturalness, fluidity and intangibility, a frame and a shape.

Other modes of presentation make it possible to integrate video stills as photographic works. They can support the space in various ways. For example video stills can be strung together in such a way, they create wallpaper made of river images, presenting in its density a kaleidoscope of snapshots of the river. Again the organic motifs are contrasted with a structure that allows complete immersion and creates simultaneity. Time is frozen and the water has come to stagnation. In this way we can quietly observe what the eye cannot perceive normally. Structures and formations of movements, but also play of light and random forms emerge that would not have been discovered without the camera. Once again photography has captured the ephemeral in a wider sense and not only time, but also the water.

Another component of the project is the use of Google Earth satellite images. They mark the place where the camera was let into the water. A relatively precise localisation of the underwater films is being made, with the area close to the river also shown from a bird eye’s perspective. The shots are presented in a meandering formation on the wall. This way Philipp Geist illustrates the idea of a network he follows when he is collecting his rivers. One river literally flows into the other, as the cuttings of the respective rivers are joined together. Monitors are placed in-between – in sizes no bigger than the photographs – to complement the macro perspective of the satellite imagery with a micro perspective from the underwater pictures.

Rivers filmed so far: (2006 – 2015)

Chao Phraya (Bangkok, Thailand)
Newa (St. Petersbourg, Russia)
Chicago River (Chicago, USA)
Dâmbovita (Bucharest, Romania)
Donau (Regensburg, Germany)
St. Laurent (Montreal, Canada)
Daugava (Riga, Litvia)
ISAR (Munich, Germany)
Thames (London, UK)
Regent Canal (London, UK)
Tiefenbach (Polling, Germany)
Spree (Berlin, Germany)
Elbe (Dresden, Germany)
Elbe (Hamburg, Germany)
Ammer (Weilheim, Germany)
Rhein (Cologne, Germany)
Ruhr (Witten a.d. Ruhr, Germany)
Amstel (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
IJ (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Weser (Bremen, Germany)
Neckar (Stuttgart, Germany)
Tevere/Tiber (Rome, Italy)
Hasslach (Kronach, Germany)
Klosterbach (Riebnitz-Damgarten, Germany)
Warnow (Rostock, Germany)
Saaler Bodden (Ahrenshoop, Germany)
Rechnitz (Riebnitz-Damgarten, Germany)
Wuhle (Berlin, Germany)

Medem (Otterndorf, Germany)
North Pazific Ocean (Vancouver, Canada)
Canal do Jardim de Alah (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
Rioni (Phasis) Kutaisi/ Georgia
(Iran, Tehran)
Nile (Raschid, Egypt)
Buriganga River/ „Old Ganges“ (Dhaka, Bangladesh)
Gera (Gera, Germany)

The video stills are published as editions. For further information please view:

Philipp Geist
www.p-geist.de
www.videogeist.de

Riverine Zones
http://riverine.videogeist.de
http://riverinezones.blogspot.com/


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Deutsche Version

RIVERINE ZONES

Eine Video-Wasser-Projekt von Philipp Geist

Wasser und Zeit sind die Konstanten im Werk von Philipp Geist. Der Künstler, Wahl-Berliner arbeitet international in den Medien Videoinstallation, Audio/Visuelle Performance, Malerei und Fotografie. Seine Projekte sind in erster Linie gekennzeichnet durch ihre Integration von Raum, Ton und Bewegbild.

Die Video-Raum-Installation ''Riverine Zones'' nimmt den Betrachter mit auf eine Entdeckungsreise durch internationale Flüsse. Der Künstler macht eine Welt sichtbar, die uns so nah und gleichzeitig doch so fern ist. Mit einer Unterwasser-Kamera streift er durch alle Zonen des Flusses: den Grund, das tiefe oder seichte Wasser und die Oberfläche. Er bezieht auch, aus der Wasserperspektive, das Ufergebiet mit ein, dessen englische Bezeichnung „riverine“ sogar Namensgeber des Projekts wurde.

Flüsse sind Teil unserer Lebenswelt, wir betrachten sie aus dem Auto, befahren sie auf Ausflugsdampfern oder sitzen an ihren Ufern. Man hat eine Vorstellung davon, wie es dort unten aussieht, Dokumentationen über Fische und Wasserpflanzen haben uns konkrete Bilder geliefert. Doch wer weiß, was dort unten jenseits aller Forschungen und dokumentarischer Auslese passiert, wenn der Kamera-Sucher nicht auf die Pirsch nach bestimmten Arten und geologischen Erscheinungen geht. Bei dem Projekt Riverine liegt der Fokus nicht auf fotorealistischen Aufnahmen, nach Naturereignissen in Echtzeit, denn der Ansatz ist nur teilweise dokumentarisch. Der Betrachter der Videoinstallation ''Riverine Zones'' versinkt vielmehr in einem alternativen Zeit-Raum, dessen ganz eigene Gesetze und Bewegungen er auf sich wirken lässt.
Und doch zeigen die Filme keinen rein zufälligen Ausschnitt des Lebens im Fluss, und keine beliebigen Aufnahmen. Philipp Geist steht am Ufer und auf Brücken und führt die Kamera. Sie wird an ihrem langen Kabel abgeseilt und lässt sich mit den Wogen des Wassers treiben. Strömung und Fließgeschwindigkeit nehmen zwar starken Einfluss auf ihre Bewegungen, weshalb Kameraschwenks und -bewegungen nicht in der gleichen Art und Weise möglich sind wie an Land, jedoch sieht Geist die Aufnahmen auf einem neben ihm stehenden Monitor und kann dadurch beeinflussen, was er wie lange und auf welche Weise filmt.

So trifft man auf vielerlei Lebewesen der Flora und Fauna, Gestein oder Unrat, oder aber die Kamera blickt ins Leere, man sieht Partikel schweben, Blasen aufsteigen oder nur ein undurchdringliches Grau. Die Ästhetik der Bilder ist teils dokumentarisch, teils fremdartig, grob und pixelig, teils fehlbelichtet, unscharf, farbintensiv oder auch monochrom. Die Kamera entführt uns in einen Unterwasser-Weltraum, den wir nicht kennen, der vielmehr durch die Kamera erst entsteht. Neben der Art der Aufnahme und Führung der Kamera ist es auch die Auswahl von verschiedenen speziellen Unterwasserkamera-Typen, die durch ihre eher einfache Bauart und durch die gelegentliche Verwendung von Lichtstrahlern die Welt verfremdet darstellen und bewirken, dass eine ganz ungewöhnliche Farbigkeit und Überzeichnung der Bilder entstehen.

Man fühlt sich vom Leben an der Luft abgeschnitten, in eine unmittelbare Parallelwelt ab- und eingetaucht. Selbst wenn Geist mit der Kamera, die dann halb aus dem Wasser ragt, das Ufer filmt, ist uns unsere gewohnte Umwelt durch diese andere Sichtweise fremd, nicht zuletzt wegen der fehlenden, uns bekannten Geräusche der Außenwelt. Unterlegt ist das Bild mit monotonem Unterwasser-Sound. Beim Betrachten fühlt man sich wie ein Schwimmer, der auftaucht und dem fehlendes Raumgefühl, ungewohnte Töne und eine Perspektive von schräg unten die Orientierung erschwert.


So werden vor allem wohlbekannte Stadtansichten neu erfahrbar gemacht. Von den Aufnahmen, die in dem langfristig angelegten Projekt von bereits 19 Flüssen gemacht wurden, zeigen einige Filme Haupt- bzw. Großstädte in Europa und Nordamerika. Ströme, Flüsse und kleine Bäche werden aber in der Installation gleichberechtigt präsentiert. Erweitert werden soll das Projekt auch um Flüsse aus anderen Kontinenten, vor allem Asien und Afrika.

Philipp Geist stellt die Unterwasserwelten verschiedener Metropolen und Orte gegenüber: Das klare Wasser eines Flusses steht im Kontrast zu einem Kanal voller weggeworfener Dinge, wie etwa Dosen, Straßenschilder oder auch Fahrräder. Mit der Herangehensweise eines Suchenden spürt er mit Unterwasser-Videokameras Lebewesen und Pflanzenwelten auf. Aspekte des menschlichen Umgangs mit der kostbaren Ressource Wasser in unterschiedlichen Regionen der Welt werden so zu Tage befördert. Die Brisanz von Umweltthemen und die Bedeutung von Umweltschutz wird dem Betrachter nicht mit dem erhobenen Zeigefinger ins Bewusstsein gebracht, eine Herangehensweise, auf die mancher schon abwehrend und resigniert reagiert. Vielmehr wird auf ungewohnte und subtile Weise nahegebracht, wie schön, rätselhaft und in letzter Konsequenz schützenswert die von unseren Giften bedrohten Lebenswelten sind.

Zusätzlich zur Verwirrung durch ungewohnte Bewegungsabläufe und Perspektiven wird die Orientierung des Betrachters durch die Art der Präsentation der Videoaufnahmen und Video-Standbilder erschwert: Geist ermöglicht mit seinen Ausstellungskonzepten ein Eintauchen in die Bildwelten nicht nur eines einzigen Flusses, sondern vieler Fließgewässer gleichzeitig. Diesen Eindruck bekommt man gerade bei wandfüllenden Projektionen mit mehreren Videoprojektoren. Die gewohnte körperliche Zuordnung zu einem Ort wird gestört und das teils realistisch wirkende Bild vermittelt dem Betrachter eine Gleichzeitigkeit der Verortung. Das Projekt wird immer für den jeweils vorhandenen Ausstellungsraum neu konzipiert. So besteht die Möglichkeit, gerade auch in kleineren Räumen die Filme auf Monitoren zu zeigen, die auf- oder nebeneinander stehen. So entsteht eine neue Räumlichkeit, in der das Geometrische, Fixierte und Technische des Monitors dem Fluss bzw. Wasser mit seinen typischen Merkmalen, nämlich das Natürliche, Flüssige und nicht Greifbare, einen Rahmen und eine Form gibt.

Weitere Ausstellungsversionen ermöglichen die Integration von Videostandbildern in Fotoformat. Diese können die Raumstruktur auf ganz unterschiedliche Art und Weise unterstützen. Zum Beispiel werden Videostills aneinandergereiht, so dass eine Tapete aus Flussbildern entsteht, die in ihrer Dichte ein Kaleidoskop von Fluss-Momentaufnahmen bildet. Auch hier wird den organischen Motiven eine Struktur entgegengesetzt, die im Ganzen ein Eintauchen ermöglicht und erneut eine Art Gleichzeitigkeit schafft. Die Zeit ist eingefroren und das Wasser zum Stillstand gekommen. So kann man in Ruhe betrachten, was das Auge normalerweise nicht fassen kann. Strukturen und Bewegungsformationen, aber auch Lichtspiele und zufällige Formen kommen zum Vorschein, die ohne Kamera unentdeckt geblieben wären. Einmal mehr hat die Fotografie im weiteren Sinne das Flüchtige festgehalten, und zwar nicht nur die Zeit, sondern auch das Wasser.

Ein weiterer Bestandteil des Projektes sind Satellitenbilder von Google Earth. Diese markieren die Stellen, an denen die Kamera ins Wasser gelassen wurde. Es wird eine relativ genaue Lokalisierung der Unterwasserfilme vorgenommen und auch die flussnahe Umgebung aus der Vogelperspektive gezeigt. Die Aufnahmen hängen in mäandernden Formationen an der Wand. So stellt Philipp Geist den Netzwerkgedanken bildlich dar, den er beim Sammeln seiner Flüsse verfolgt. Ein Fluss fließt buchstäblich in den anderen, da die Ausschnitte der jeweiligen Flüsse aneinandergefügt werden. Dazwischen sind Monitore in der Größe eines Fotos platziert, die den Makroblick der Satellitenbilder um einen Mikroblick der Unterwasser-Aufnahmen ergänzen.


Bisher gefilmte Flüsse: (2006 – 2015)

Chao Phraya (Bangkok, Thailand)
Newa (St. Petersbourg, Russia)
Chicago River (Chicago, USA)
Dâmbovita (Bucharest, Romania)
Donau (Regensburg, Germany)
St. Laurent (Montreal, Canada)
Daugava (Riga, Litvia)
ISAR (Munich, Germany)
Thames (London, UK)
Regent Canal (London, UK)
Tiefenbach (Polling, Germany)
Spree (Berlin, Germany)
Elbe (Dresden, Germany)
Elbe (Hamburg, Germany)
Ammer (Weilheim, Germany)
Rhein (Cologne, Germany)
Ruhr (Witten a.d. Ruhr, Germany)
Amstel (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
IJ (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Weser (Bremen, Germany)
Neckar (Stuttgart, Germany)
Tevere/Tiber (Rome, Italy)
Hasslach (Kronach, Germany)
Klosterbach (Riebnitz-Damgarten, Germany)
Warnow (Rostock, Germany)
Saaler Bodden (Ahrenshoop, Germany)
Rechnitz (Riebnitz-Damgarten, Germany)
Wuhle (Berlin, Germany)

Medem (Otterndorf, Germany)
North Pazific Ocean (Vancouver, Canada)
Canal do Jardim de Alah (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
Rioni (Phasis) Kutaisi/ Georgia
(Iran, Tehran)
Nile (Raschid, Egypt)
Buriganga River/ „Old Ganges“ (Dhaka, Bangladesh)
Gera (Gera, Germany)

Die Videostandbilder werden als Editionen herausgegeben. Weitere Informationen auf:

Philipp Geist
www.p-geist.de
www.videogeist.de

Riverine Zones
http://riverine.videogeist.de
http://riverinezones.blogspot.com/